ISTE Standards

The World Literature Classroom, Digital Natives, and Ed Tech

  • 1.  The World Literature Classroom, Digital Natives, and Ed Tech

    Posted 12-19-2014 18:44
    This message has been cross posted to the following Discussions: ISTE Commons and Project ReimaginED .
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    Hello,

    So, I am transitioning from the middle school ELA classroom to a 9th/10th Grade World Literature  classroom in January and have been thinking of ways I can be innovative and integrate technology with the Common Core standards in that grade level. I am new to this subject, but I love talking to other teachers.

    So, here is the question.

    How do you take the material in World Lit and connect it to our digital natives?

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    Sarah Winchester
    Teacher
    Buchanan GA
    (678) 938-2004
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    ISTE 2019 Reg Open


  • 2.  RE:The World Literature Classroom, Digital Natives, and Ed Tech

    Posted 12-19-2014 20:27

    There are many ways...

    I use Glogster.com to have students create online posters of themselves and of novels. You could have students work in groups on Glogster or Prezi numerous assignments. I know there are websites to create time lines. Or you can have cross class discussions online. Also eduCannon, Near pod will help presenting visual lectures, and Kahoot, which is amazing, is great for a quick group quiz. Also, have groups create a video or PSA about a lit issue using their smart phones and wevideo. Students could create a Libguide, or if you have a Weekly account, your students can access their own weekly account and post, discuss, blog, most everything as save all of their work for the year.

    I hope this helps. I teach high school English, this year sophomores, and do all of these things except for the Libguides.
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    Tracy Weaver
    teacher
    Mesa AZ
    (480) 4727048
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    ISTE 2019 Reg Open


  • 3.  RE: The World Literature Classroom, Digital Natives, and Ed Tech

    Posted 12-21-2014 03:15
    A HS teacher in Maryland created an effective lesson using Blendspace:
    "Blendspace allows its users to create an online space composed of different "tiles." These tiles are all related to the same topic, essential question, or theme chosen by the creator, you.  The content of each tile comes in many forms such as a YouTube video, Google form, Flickr image, a link to an external webpage, an uploaded image/file, a Dropbox file, a Google Drive file, or a bookmark. Since the creator can upload a Googledoc, the tile can be composed of an Excel file, a Word file, or a PPT file. The beauty of Blendspace is that it allows the creator to create a visual, electronic file folder of sorts for the visitors to peruse. On this website, you will find a lesson pertaining to the background information of the graphic novel Persepolis, a memoir about a girl's coming of age during the Iranian Revolution."

    She also discusses the use of ThngLink in an AP class. Students analyzed an AP-style prompt and evaluated classmates' evaluations of AP-style prompts. 

    Click here to view her Blog.

    Natalie Janiszewski
    Instructor
    Loyola University Maryland



    ISTE 2019 Reg Open


  • 4.  RE: The World Literature Classroom, Digital Natives, and Ed Tech

    Posted 01-07-2015 19:52
    Ladies,

    I love these! I am going to explore these more and see how I can incorporate them into my classrooms!

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    Sarah Winchester
    Teacher
    Buchanan GA
    (678) 938-2004
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    ISTE 2019 Reg Open


  • 5.  RE: The World Literature Classroom, Digital Natives, and Ed Tech

    Posted 01-08-2015 09:19
    Hi Sarah,

    I taught 9th and 10th grade World literature in a 1:1 environment for 14 years.  (This is my first year out of the classroom.)  I am not sure what works you are studying this semester, but I will share some of my favorite lessons over the years.  For everything I used OneNote for a class notebook that allowed the students to collaborate.

    Mythology - I asked each student to be the authority on a selected myth and teach the class the story and the significance of the story.  Students were tasked with not only teaching the events in the story, but asked to explain its universal significance as well as identify modern day allusions to the myth of their choice.  As a culminating event at the end of the semester (and really just for fun during their Genius hour), my group last year created "Mythology World" - an amusement park that brought to life Greek mythology - in Minecraft.

    Satire & Parody - I had a unit for satire and parody where we studied excerpts from Don Quixote and Candide.  After we studied the two pieces of literature, I asked the students to create their own satire/parody.  Students had a choice in the final product - a written work, a song, a video, etc.

    The Metamorphosis - As we studied the Metamorphosis, students created a facebook page from Gregor's perspective before he transformed, adding posts, pictures, thoughts and messages from friends/family that would bring to life what Gregor was struggling with before his transformation.

    All Quiet on the Western Front - I had a tic-tac-toe assignment where the students selected three different components to examine/reflect on during their study of the novel.  It allowed for lots of choice and creativity.  Additionally, students "tweeted" (on paper because social media is blocked at my school) regarding the two themes of lost youth and the horror of war from the perspective of Paul.

    Poetry - We studied a collection of poets and their poetry.  Student groups of 2 selected a poet and their poems and created glogs that taught others about the poet and their poetry.  They also chose one of the poems and turned it into a movie.  Their movie was added to the glog as well.

    Haiku and Tanka - In teams of two students analyzed haiku and tanka poems.  Each group had a page in our OneNote notebook and they were able to add their analysis of mood, message, tone to the OneNote page.  They also added to the page two images that they felt related to the poem.

    The Count of Monte Cristo - I turned it into a mock trial project.  You can read about the project and see the details here - https://www.educatornetwork.com/Resources/LearningActivities/Details/60ac3c53-382d-4e27-ab7d-4c86a3bbe3f8

    I think that covers most of it.  If you like any of the units and want my rubrics, etc., I am happy to share.  My email is KEtheredge@stpaulsmobile.net

    Best,



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    Kelli Etheredge
    Teaching and Learning Resources Director
    St. Paul's Episcopal School
    Mobile AL
    (251) 461-2125
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    ISTE 2019 Reg Open